Environment & Interior Design: International Studio

Environment & Interior Design: International Studio

Participating Institutions

Host: Environmental and Interior Design (EID), School of Design, The Hong Kong Polyutechnic University, Hong Kong. 

Interior & Spatial Design, Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building, The University of Technology Sydney, Australia.

Department of Architecture, landscape Architecture and Interior Design, Faculty of the built Environment, The University of Pretoria, South Africa.

The Model and the Lived, beyond the 60m2 mean. An investigation into Hong Kong’s Domestic Models as representations of a square foot societies.

What insights can a spatial interrogation of Hong Kong’s domestic models and its transformative variants deliver in terms of a territory’s processes of compressed domesticity and possible future design prospects? Furthermore, how would the understanding of these models not only question,but, concomitantly reflect the ideologies of a ‘square foot society’ in comparison to other domestic models globally to develop relevant future domestic models?

Domestic dwelling types, representative of social modularity, have globally become a malleableurban resource. As urban necessity housing in general remains part and parcel to political ideologies and speculative developmental models whilst reflecting, at the individual level, adaptability and social necessity. Defined by the United Nations as basic human right1, housing exposes social engagement, domestic appropriation and policy standards, bringing to bear the full burden of what can only be referred to as compressed living and the speculative domesticity within the 21st Century.

What is more, housing remains specific to each context and culture. Linked to the 19th Century’s industrialisation processes a number of housing types are found to reflects the roles and ideologies of the time through spatial planning. ‘Shawl’ housing models of India, 51/9 estates built prior to South Africa’s 1994 democracy, embodies ‘models’ as periodic social registers. In retrospect, the housing models have become transformative devices in own right, evident through the manner in which models have become [re]appropriated through the acts of the ‘lived’.

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Miscellaneous